Master of Arts in Marital and Family Therapy (MAMFT)

Program Overview

The MAMFT program is a 48-hour program designed to meet the academic licensure requirements for the Marriage and Family Therapy (LMFT) in Oklahoma. The MAMFT track is ideal for students interested in focusing more thoroughly on Marriage and Family therapy. The curriculum is divided into 14 modules containing theoretical and applied psychotherapy courses and 450 hours of internship.

MAMFT track students will go through the program with their MSCP/MACP counterparts, but will split off in module 14 to take Martial and Family Systems. Students are generally able to complete the MAMFT program in approximately a year and a half.

The courses (modules) are taken sequentially to allow focused study on one subject area at a time. Class meetings occur one night per week for a four-hour session for the first year of the program. In year two, classes will occur over intensive weekend courses that meet Friday evenings for four hours and all day Saturday for eight hours. Extensive directed study occurs outside the classroom, in preparation for participative learning experiences during class time.

In addition to the courses, the MAMFT student will complete a 450-hour Internship. Work on all components of the program (modules and internship) occurs simultaneously. The internship is a vital component of counselor preparation and is a supervised experience in marital and family therapy counseling situations. This process is initiated briefly in the first module, but is developed more fully during the internship placement. Internships begin at the end of the first semester and are completed by the fourth and final semester. The internship occurs in approved clinical settings where marital or marriage counseling is an integral part of the practice. Throughout the program, the student is encouraged to apply the training from the psychotherapy lab courses.

The clinical capstone of the program occurs in the Multicultural Treatment Planning course. The student integrates the assessment, diagnostic and treatment process into a clinical demonstration of his/her ability to conceptualize the dynamics of the client and to articulate a comprehensive treatment plan.

A scientist practitioner model of professional training assumes that in order to become professional qualified in marital therapy or family therapy; you must seek to understand the research underpinnings of the discipline while simultaneously developing counseling knowledge and skills. The Research Methods course is the primary tool for helping the student to develop competency in research.

All masters’ degree programs at SNU require an exit evaluation. In the MAMFT program, the exit evaluation takes the form of a Clinical Competency Interview (CCI). The Clinical Competency Interview (CCI) is a way of demonstrating clinical competency of the student and synthesizing the various clinical components of the program. The CCI is intended to evaluate the student’s competence in assessing, diagnosing, and treating clients.

Degree Requirements

Course Descriptions


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