Student working in chemistry lab

Chemistry

As an SNU Chemistry student, you can expect a program equipped to enhance your learning. Your laboratory classes will have no more than 25 students, allowing you maximum attention from our highly-qualified staff. In the SNU biochemistry program you will be in a powerful community of learning that is committed to the integration of faith and learning. And be sure to check out the University Scholarships available to Chemistry students. Ask about them when you visit campus. Our facilities allow you to learn through a unique hands-on approach with the use of several pieces of modern equipment. UV/Vis spectrometers. Mass spectrometer. ICP spectrometer. FT-IR spectrometer. HPLC chromatographs. Gas chromatographs. Multinuclear FT-NMR spectrometer. Computerized data collection. Dataflow programming using LabVIEW. WITH UNIQUE.

This program is designed for preparation of students seeking a variety of career and learning paths including Pharmacology. 

At SNU we know you need more than just classroom lectures to learn. That’s why we create unique environments to take your education to the next level. Consider spending a semester abroad in Costa Rica where you can take several courses ranging from tropical ecology to global stewardship. You will be able to work at the Quetzal Education Research Center in the heart of Costa Rica. Study ecology and sustainability on site in a tropical rainforest! Or even conduct your own independent research. A rare opportunity to find at a private university. Or consider applying for a Lab Assistant position in a variety of classrooms. General Chemistry. Organic Chemistry. Analytical Chemistry. Chemistry stockroom.

When you graduate with your degree in chemistry from SNU, you’ll have the preparation you need for a successful career in many professions such as:

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemist
  • Consulting
  • Forensic Science
  • Medicine

SNU Chemistry graduates leave well-qualified for their next path. Recent graduates have continued studies in PhD programs at respected schools. Texas A&M. Indiana. Kansas. Cornell. Oklahoma. Ohio State. Rochester. Others have continued into professional schools. Medical. Dental. Pharmacy. Law School. While some have jumped right into career paths. Medical research. Forensic science. But don’t take our word for it, meet Terrance Codd, SNU Chemistry graduate. Codd is currently in his fifth year of graduate studies for physical chemistry at The Ohio State University. His research uses cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the near infrared region to study radicals that are of atmospheric interest. Most recently he has been using high resolution and moderate resolution cavity ringdown spectroscopy to study the nitrate radical. Aside from marrying his wife shortly after graduation and recently having their first child, Codd’s achievements include giving several talks on his research at conferences and contributing to a number of published projects. Currently, he is putting the finishing touches on an article about the vibronic structure of the nitrate radical. “I participated in undergraduate research while at SNU and did a summer REU at Kent State University under Dr. Tubergen both of which provided me with valuable experience. While at SNU I also had the opportunity to get hands on experience with many different kinds of modern chemical instrumentation which led to my interest in spectroscopy,” says Codd of his time at SNU. “The chemistry, math, and physics courses I took got me in to graduate school which will probably end up being a net positive in my life.”

SNU offers you the opportunity to study with credentialed faculty as you journey toward graduation, another step closer to reaching your goals. These scholars with a Christian worldview will mentor and guide you along the way.  SNU’s smaller size allows students to interact with faculty — not only in the classroom, but also through impactful mentoring, personal advising, and meaningful research. Come and be known; come and belong.

Visit the Faculty page.


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